Detention

Irregular migrants can be detained for up to 18 months before being deported, according to the laws of the European Union (EU). In 2017, nearly 47,000 people were detained in France. Migrant detention facilities in France are often cramped and have prison-like security measures in place. Access to outdoor spaces may be limited, and there is little opportunity for recreational activities.

The UK also uses migrant detention facilities. They have one of the largest detention centres in Europe, with nearly 29,000 people detained on immigration related charges in 2018, including over 13,000 asylum seekers and 42 minors. Many of these migrants will be returned to their home countries or the first country they passed in which they could have applied for asylum. There have been several complaints about conditions at short-term holding facilities, including poor lighting and ventilation, and inadequate sleeping or washing facilities.

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French police clears largest migrant camp near Calais

Around 200 migrants were forced to abandon an informal camp in France after police cleared the area on 12 March 2019. Before its destruction, the camp, known as the Verrotières or Chemin du...
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Libya detention riot leaves dozens of migrants injured

About 50 migrants have been injured when guards came in to stop a protest by migrants and asylum seekers at a detention centre in Tripoli, Libya, on 26 February 2019. According to the UN Refugee...
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European Court Rules in Favour of Child Migrant

France has been ordered by the European Union Court of Human Rights to pay an unaccompanied Afghan child migrant EUR 15,000. The fine was imposed for failure to protect the 12-year-old migrant when...
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